Tagged: TOMMY BOLIN

TOMMY BOLIN ARTWORK

TOMMY BOLIN IN A CREEK ON MT TAMALPAIS. PHOTO/ART BY BEN UPHAM.


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Tommy Bolin was born in Sioux City, Iowa and began playing in bands around the city as a youth (“A Patch of Blue” and others) before moving to Boulder, Colorado, in his late teens. He had played in a band called American Standard before joining Ethereal Zephyr, a band named after a train that ran between Denver and Chicago. When record companies became interested, the name was shortened to Zephyr. This band included Bolin on guitar, David Givens on bass, and Givens’ wife Candy Givens on vocals. The band had begun to do larger venues, opening for more established acts such as Led Zeppelin. Their second album, entitled Going Back to Colorado, featured a new drummer, Bobby Berge, who would pop up from time to time in musician credits in album liner notes from Bolin’s later projects.

In 1972 Bolin, at the age of 20, formed the fusion jazz-rock-blues band Energy. While the band never released an album during Bolin’s lifetime, several recordings have been released posthumously. He also played on Billy Cobham’s Spectrum album, which included Bolin on guitar, Billy Cobham of Mahavishnu Orchestra on drums, Leland Sklar on bass and Jan Hammer (also of Mahavishnu Orchestra) on keyboards and synthesizers.

1973 found him as Domenic Troiano’s replacement, who had replaced Joe Walsh, in the James Gang. He had two records with this band: Bang! in 1973 and Miami in 1974.

After the Miami tour, Bolin wanted out of the James Gang. He went on to do session work for numerous rock bands and also with a number of jazz artists including Alphonse Mouzon’s album Mind Transplant, considered “one of the best fusion recordings of all time” by Allmusic reviewer Robert Taylor. He also toured with Carmine Appice, Moxy and The Good Rats.

Bolin signed with Nemperor records to record a solo album. Bolin decided to do his own vocals on this album as well. Session players on this record included David Foster, David Sanborn, Jan Hammer, Stanley Sheldon, Phil Collins and Glenn Hughes. During the recording of this album, he was contacted to replace Ritchie Blackmore in Deep Purple.

In the start of 1975, Bolin contributed some studio guitar assistance to Canadian band Moxy during the recording of their debut album. Later in 1975 saw the release of Bolin’s first solo record, Teaser, on the Nemperor label. After Ritchie Blackmore left Deep Purple, the band had a meeting and discussed whether to disband or try and find a replacement, and chose the second option. David Coverdale had been listening to the Billy Cobham LP (Spectrum). He decided he wanted Tommy in Deep Purple, and invited him over for a jam. Tommy showed up thin as a rail with his girlfriend in tow wearing a see through mesh mini-skirt. He plugged in to 4 Marshall amps and jammed with the band for 4 hours. The job was his. The band then relocated to Munich, Germany, to begin work in Come Taste the Band. Bolin wrote or co-wrote seven of the record’s nine tracks, including the instrumental “Owed to G,” which was a tribute to George Gershwin. Come Taste the Band was released in late 1975, and Australian, US and Japanese tours ensued.

After Deep Purple disbanded in March, 1976, Bolin was back on the road with his solo band with plans for a second solo record. The band had a rotating cast of players which included Narada Michael Walden, Mark Stein, Norma Jean Bell, Reggie McBride, Jimmy Haslip, Max Carl Gronenthal and eventually Bolin’s younger brother Johnnie Bolin on drums.

By mid-1976, CBS signed Bolin and he began to record Private Eyes, his second and last solo record.
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TOMMY BOLIN DISCOGRAPHY:
1975 Teaser
1976 Private Eyes
1996 From the Archives, Vol. 1
1997 The Bottom Shelf
1998 From the Archives, Vol. 2
1999 Energy
1999 Snapshot
2000 Naked
2002 Naked II
2004 After Hours: The Glen Holly Jams – Volume 1
2006 Whips and Roses
2006 Whips and Roses II
2011 Teaser Deluxe

Live:
1997 Live at Ebbets Field 1974
1997 Live at Ebbets Field 1976
1997 Live at Northern Lights Recording Studio
1998 The Energy Radio Broadcasts
2000 First Time Live
2001 Live 9/19/76
2002 Live in Miami at Jai Alai: The Final Show
2003 Alive on Long Island
2003 Tommy Bolin and Energy Live
2004 Albany 9/20/76
2004 Live at the Jet Bar
1969 Zephyr
1971 Going Back to Colorado
1996 Live at Art’s Bar and Grill

Energy
1998 The Energy Radio Broadcasts 1972
1999 Energy (1972)
2003 Tommy Bolin & Energy, Live in Boulder / Sioux City 1972

James Gang:
1973 Bang
1974 Miami

Billy Cobham:
1973 Spectrum
2002 The Spectrum Sessions

Alphonse Mouzon:
1975 Mind Transplant
1999 Tommy Bolin & Alphonse Mouzon Fusion Jam (Rehearsals 1974)

Moxy
1975 Moxy

Deep Purple:
Come Taste the Band (1975)
1977 Last Concert in Japan
1995 King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents: Deep Purple in Concert
1995 On the Wings of a Russian Foxbat – Live in California ’76
2000 Days May Come and Days May Go (The California Rehearsals Volume 1)
2000 1420 Beachwood Drive (The California Rehearsals Volume 2)
2001 This Time Around
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Tommy Bolin jamming in a creek on Mt. Tamalpais. Image by Ben Upham. Magical Moment Photos.

TOMMY BOLIN JAMMING IN THE CREEK ON MT. TAMALPAIS. PHOTO/ART BY BEN UPHAM.


CLICK ON THE LINKS BELOW TO SEE MORE TOMMY BOLIN PHOTOS & ART:
TOMMY BOLIN FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM
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TOMMY BOLIN CONCERT PHOTOS FROM WINTERLAND BY BEN UPHAM
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ORDER TOMMY BOLIN “WHIPS & ROSES” CD

TOMMY BOLIN- “WHIPS & ROSES” (2006) (REVIEWS)

#1-
“Finally the World Can Hear Him”
By Joe (Denver, CO)
April 27, 2006

This is a remarkable (and completely authorized) compilation. Every track is nothing short of a masterpiece. No release has ever done a better job of demonstrating what Tommy was capable of a musician and we should all be grateful that these recordings were discovered and presented here in the finest form.
Some songs are familiar, although very fresh and taken from different versions not heard quite like this before. “Teaser”, “Wild Dogs”, “Savannah Woman” and “Dreamer” all make stunning appearances showing Tommy in top form as both a singer and a guitarist. “Marching Powder”, one of Tommy’s trademark instrumental jams is featured here with bursts of guitar magic that will knock you off your feet. A new mix of “Crazed Fandango” (titled here as simply “Fandango”) is sure to have jaw-dropping effects on any listener.
But it’s the new songs, the songs we’ve never heard before, that will prove what a legendary player Tommy should be. A rough jam called “Cookoo” finds Tommy leading the way through heavy jazz/rock territory with lightning speed and fierce energy. Tommy seems to lay down the most intricate and beautiful guitar lines with effortless precision. And “Cookoo” is only a taste of the energy to come.
With “Flyin’ Fingers”, Tommy casts the rules aside and blazes through the 16 minute jam picking up every style you could imagine along the way. He uses elements of rock and jazz and Latin rhythms as stepping stones, blending them all into a style all very much his own before leaping into something new. By this point it is more than obvious how much Tommy’s genius has been ignored by history almost entirely. His sheer virtuosity is immeasurable and “Flyin’ Fingers” is proof of just that.
Rounding out the amazing set on Whips and Roses are two live tracks capturing Tommy in his best setting. “Just Don’t Fall Down” is a song from his most undocumented and underrated band Energy. Generally known as “Hok-a-Hey”, this track is Tommy’s playground, as he leads the band around mind-bending grooves, wrapping the monstrous riff around his own unmistakable style.
On “Blowin’ Your Cookies”, Tommy does just that. This track is taken from a jam with a hotel band at the Seven Seas Lounge in Miami just one night before his untimely death. It’s sad to imagine that night when you hear how remarkable his playing is. Tommy was in perfect form and his presence on this jam is felt very deeply. It is a fitting end to this amazing compilation, and an even better showing of what this master guitarist was capable of.
Tommy Bolin was one of the greatest guitarists to ever pick up the instrument. His playing is sadly forgotten, but if the world hears Whips and Roses, then he will surely be recognized for his genius. The world lost an incredible artist when Tommy died, and it would be a disgrace to music itself if he continues to go unnoticed. Listen to Whips and Roses and you will understand how profound his playing was. If you know who Tommy is, then you will be blown away by these rare gems now unearthed for all to hear. If you do no know Tommy, then do not continue to ignore some of the finest music you will ever have the chance to hear.

#2-
“Smokin’!!!!!!!!!!!”
By Vincent Sciglio (Putnam, NY USA)
May 23, 2006

Tommy Bolin is undoubtedly the most underrated and forgotten guitar hero of all time. Nobody covered the scope of guitar playing better than Tommy as he effortlessly shifted gears from rock to jazz to blues to funk to reggae not only within an album, but within a single track. This CD showcases many of Tommy’s guitar stylings in a new light, bringing them sonically into today’s standards. I have been listening to Tommy for 20 years and own all of his studio releases as well as all of the Tommy Bolin Archives releases and this is the best quality yet. As other reviewers have stated, this material isn’t new but the versions presented here are stellar. Tommy was a master at jamming and some of his best work is captured on this CD. I have been turning people on to Tommy for years and they are blown away when they hear his playing. This CD will serve the same purpose for the younger generation today who have never heard playing of this calibur as it is non existent in today’s music scene. Tommy was a musician’s musician and was way ahead of his time, hopefully this CD will give new exposure to his timeless music. In sum, buy this CD, enjoy it and turn your friends and family onto this great musician.

#3-
“Whips and Roses for Mott’s delight”
By Kim Fletcher (Pattaya, Chonburi Thailand)
December 8, 2006

In 2006 we were given this collection ‘Whips and Roses’. The music is stunning. Tommy Bolin’s singing and guitar playing is simply jaw droppingly good. The album opens with a rockin’ version of ‘Teaser’ which fairly rocks out of your speakers whilst retaining that trademark Bolin funky backbeat. A lot of the other songs are works in progress for the Teaser album, this does not mean that they are inferior versions in fact I think every song on this album is absolutely at it’s zenith, and the title of the songs is irrelevant. Second track on the album is ‘Fandango’ which was called ‘Crazed Fandango’ when the studio version was released. ‘Cookoo’ is a jam based on the Tommy Bolin classic ‘Homeward Strut’, but boy what a jam. The version of ‘Wild Dogs on this album is the best I have ever heard, and is worth the price of the album alone. Starting with it’s downbeat vocals of a drifter on the road, before Tommy makes the six strings howl as the song builds to a shattering climax. Why this song has not been covered by other bands I do not know, but somebody like Bon Jovi could do a cracking version. There is also Jeff Cooks beautiful ballad Dreamer here. Tommy Bolin must have burnt his fingers his playing is so fast on ‘Marching Powder’. You can almost hear the sweat running down the fret board. The fifteen minutes of Flyin’ Fingers speaks for itself. The album finishes with two jam work out’s with Tommy Bolin letting the music carry him away. ‘Just Don’t Fall Down’ clocks in at nearly eleven exciting minutes, the aptly titled ‘Blowin’ Your Cookies’ was recorded the night before Tommy Bolin passed away, when Tommy got up and played with the house band at his hotel in Miami. It is a twelve minute drop into what was obviously a longer jam, but the guitar work is staggeringly good. There is no information on who played what on what track as most of these recordings have been taken from unmarked boxes, but whoever they were they were very good. The album comes with a fine booklet with some informed liner notes by Simon Robinson. The production was handled by Greg Hampton in association with Tommy Bolin’s brother John. The work they have done should be applauded, a second volume of ‘Whips and Roses’ is promised for early 2007, I personally will look forward to that.

#4-
“In a word – Brilliant!”
By B. Worth
May 2, 2006

This CD has been long anticipated and it does not disappoint. As was the case with Tommy’s two solo albums, there is something for everyone here. There a few alternate versions of songs that ended up on his Teaser album. For example, the song “Teaser” is much more aggressive than the version that ended up on the album of the same name and, in my opinion, is better for it. And there are a handful of superb in-studio jamming that will make the hair on your arms stand up. There is so much of Tommy’s guitar buzzing around these tracks that any fan of his (and/or fans of rock/jazz-rock) will be satisfied.
I have only two negative comments (and the reasons why I can’t give it a full 5 out of 5 stars): the last 2 songs are not relevant to the bulk of material contained herein. The song “Just Don’t Fall Down” is clearly Energy running through their epic instrumental “Hoka Hey” live on stage somewhere in 1972 and “Blowin’ Your Cookies” is an excerpt from Tommy’s jam with the house band at the Seven Seas Lounge in Miami, FL (a night or two before his untimely death in Dec 1976). Its all good music to have in the collection but some more detailed sleevnotes would be helpful for Bolin fanatics such as myself. Which segues nicely to my 2nd issue: the sleeve notes lack any identification of the musicians accompanying Tommy and that is a shame because whomever the uncredited persons playing the bass and drums were, they were doing a marvelous job.
Thank you to the Bolin family and everyone who has worked on this set. I can’t wait for the next installment.

#5-
“Amazing . Radical. Revelation. SUPREME GUITAR!”
By herb “nice name huh?”
April 26,2006

I don’t think it is too much of a stretch to say that this disc contains the most radical soloing ever heard from Bolin. You must buy it if you are a fan of great guitar playing. It is surprisingly like John Mclaughlin at times, yet, still totally Bolin. I thought i’d heard it all having owned all the Ebbetts field stuff, as well as the Mouzon/Cobham albums. The liner notes may be a bit lacking, but that is almost appropriate as this stuff almost seems too good to be true. There are 10 minute plus jams of pure guitar madness. How often does it happen that someone un-earths material like this.??..I am not sure it has ever happened. Yeah, never before has an artist been unveiled like this before, so long after they are gone. And this is the first of a series! Wow.

TOMMY BOLIN DISCOGRAPHY:
1975 Teaser
1976 Private Eyes
1996 From the Archives, Vol. 1
1997 The Bottom Shelf
1998 From the Archives, Vol. 2
1999 Energy
1999 Snapshot
2000 Naked
2002 Naked II
2004 After Hours: The Glen Holly Jams – Volume 1
2006 Whips and Roses
2006 Whips and Roses II
2011 Teaser Deluxe

Live:
1997 Live at Ebbets Field 1974
1997 Live at Ebbets Field 1976
1997 Live at Northern Lights Recording Studio
1998 The Energy Radio Broadcasts
2000 First Time Live
2001 Live 9/19/76
2002 Live in Miami at Jai Alai: The Final Show
2003 Alive on Long Island
2003 Tommy Bolin and Energy Live
2004 Albany 9/20/76
2004 Live at the Jet Bar
1969 Zephyr
1971 Going Back to Colorado
1996 Live at Art’s Bar and Grill

Energy
1998 The Energy Radio Broadcasts 1972
1999 Energy (1972)
2003 Tommy Bolin & Energy, Live in Boulder / Sioux City 1972

James Gang:
1973 Bang
1974 Miami

Billy Cobham:
1973 Spectrum
2002 The Spectrum Sessions

Alphonse Mouzon:
1975 Mind Transplant
1999 Tommy Bolin & Alphonse Mouzon Fusion Jam (Rehearsals 1974)

Moxy
1975 Moxy

Deep Purple:
Come Taste the Band (1975)
1977 Last Concert in Japan
1995 King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents: Deep Purple in Concert
1995 On the Wings of a Russian Foxbat – Live in California ’76
2000 Days May Come and Days May Go (The California Rehearsals Volume 1)
2000 1420 Beachwood Drive (The California Rehearsals Volume 2)
2001 This Time Around

CLICK THE LINKS BELOW FOR TOMMY BOLIN PHOTOS & ART:
TOMMY BOLIN FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM
and
TOMMY BOLIN CONCERT PHOTOS FROM WINTERLAND BY BEN UPHAM
and
ORDER TOMMY BOLIN “WHIPS & ROSES” CD

TOMMY BOLIN AT WINTERLAND ON 5-7-76. PHOTO BY BEN UPHAM. MAGICAL MOMENT PHOTOS.

TOMMY BOLIN LIVE AT WINTERLAND ON MAY 7, 1976. PHOTO ART BY BEN UPHAM.


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TOMMY BOLIN PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM
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TOMMY BOLIN
“LIVED HARD, DIED HARD”
BY JOHN HUDDY
COLORADO SPRINGS GAZETTE
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO
DECEMBER 17, 1976

Only 24 hours before Tommy Bolin played the final rock and roll concert of his life, the wiry, good-looking Sioux City musician walked alone into a nightclub. He sat on a five-foot-high wooden stool, ordering at the same time three Margaritas and three double martinis. The 25-year-old musician drank the six cocktails quietly and almost at once, a witness remembers, and then Tommy Bolin, a strong, bright music industry flame about to self-extinguish fell backwards off the stool onto the floor dead drunk.
Tommy Bolin whose gross earnings total an astonishing $750.000 since June 1975, according to his personal manager, had fewer than 30 hours to live. It was Dec. 2.
“Report, of the Medical Examiner: 118.01-1,13. Name of Deceased: Thomas Richard Bolin. Date: 12-4-76, 5:30 a.m. Case number: 7B-277-5. Identified by: Richard Barry Wood. 4315 Sunset Dr., Hollywood. Calif. 09927. Manager. The body is that of a well-developed, well-nourished young Caucasian adult male that appears to be the recorded age of 25. Measures 5 feet 9 inches, weighs 175. The body exhibits a moderate degree of rigidity and moderate purplish lividity over the back portions of the torso and extremities.”
From Janis Joplin to Jimi Hendrix. From Jim Morrison to Paul Kossoff, superbly talented rock superstars have perished in their own fireballs of hard living, financial pressure, image making, image breaking and hard narcotics — which at first glance appears the fate of Tommy Bolin, whose eight-year career included stints with Deep Purple, the James Gang, Energy, and his own, newly formed band.
Tommy Bolin however, seems to have been different.
He spent his money recklessly and foolishly — his closest associates will concede that much — but Bolin had not tired of his career, the most acute symptom of self-destruction in the rock asylum, nor was he without close ties to family.
Before the Miami concert, Bolin spent the Thanksgiving holiday period with Mom and Dad, and brothers Johnny, 18, and Rick, 17, back home in Sioux City, Iowa. He then performed his first hometown concert since breaking with Deep Purple earlier this year. The performance went very well, and friends recall long standing ovations.
Which does not explain why Tommy Bolin staggered reeling drunk through four days of Miami vacation prior to the Friday concert, nor his off-hand remark to road manager Richard Wood before the final performance. “I want my life to be as exciting as it can possibly be,” Bolin told his friend, “to die young and to leave behind a good-looking corpse.” Bolin and Wood laughed.
The facial hair is shaven except for long sideburns to the level of the earlobes. The irises are brown, and the pupils are brown and in mid dilation. The ears and nose and throat are grossly unremarkable except for the presence of a moderate amount of pinkish foam at the mouth and nostrils. The left earlobe exhibits the presence of two pierced holes, and in them there is a long earring made up of metal wire, a black bead and some long fowl feathers. In the front of the left earlobe there are three small contused abrasions.” “I don’t know what happened,” says personal manager Barry Fey from his Denver, Colo., office. “Tommy wanted so much to be a success, not just for himself, but for the people around him. including me. He was doted on by all the big stars. I know that. But he couldn’t live their lifestyle: he couldn’t afford it. He went through an awful lot of money because he didn’t want to live like an opening act. I think working with Deep Purple spoiled him. The man had gone through $750,000 in less than
two years.”
The final hours of Tommy Bolin…
On the night of the Miami concert, Bolin wears tight, black velvet pants, a red velvet jacket with flared sleeves and a $150, handmade T-shirt with the name of the Tubes rock group on the front.
Stone sober or just plain stoned. Tommy Bolin, everyone agrees, walks onstage shortly after 8:30 p.m. at the Miami Jai-Alai Fronton. His opening number is “Teaser,” a cut from his first solo album. Bolin performs for just under 50 minutes, about normal for a name opening act. His final tune, the last song of his rock and roll career, is called “Post Toastie.” It is a song about drug abuse. “Don’t let your mind Post-Toastie. Don’t let your brain get fried. Like a lotta my friends did.” “The left upper extremity exhibits the presence of four ecchymoses (bruises), some of which appear to be evolving ecchymoses. Two of these are located within the left lower forearm.
One is over the left upper forearm and in the left antecubital fossa (the crook of-the elbow), although the latter appears to be the more recent one.”
Over the telephone, Bolin’s personal manager is read the autopsy report. “Oh my God,” Fey gasps. “Oh Jesus.” There is a pause. Fey cannot talk on the telephone for several moments . Finally he returns. ‘Give me a second, will you.” he says in a broken voice. “Oh Jesus. Does it really say all that?
“Tommy was scared of a needle, I swear to God that’s true. I can’t imagine that he would shoot himself in the arm. He had a bad throat last month, and when I took him to the doctor, he was afraid of any drug and any needle.”
Tommy Bolin leaves the Jai-Alai stage at 9:20 p.m. and meets Wood in the wings. He seems excited and pleased. “Wow, I’m really happy about tonight,” Bolin says. “It really came off well!” The two men hug each other. Bolin returns to his hotel, driven to the Beach by L.C. Layton, a muscular, black stagehand and bodyguard. After changing clothes, Bolin drops into a small bar off the main hotel lounge, according to band members.
Bolin leaves the small lounge at 2:30 a.m.” with several equipment handlers, or “roadies,” employed by the band. First Bolin goes to his own room, then to the nearby hotel room of either Clayton or Jeff Ocheltree, a second crew member (officers are not sure which one). Clayton and Ocheltree later tell police that Bolin is sober and lucid when the guitar player leaves at 2 a.m. At about 7.50 a.m., the manager of the resort hotel receives a terse call from Room 902.

TOMMY BOLIN DISCOGRAPHY:

1975 Teaser
1976 Private Eyes
1996 From the Archives, Vol. 1
1997 The Bottom Shelf
1998 From the Archives, Vol. 2
1999 Energy
1999 Snapshot
2000 Naked
2002 Naked II
2004 After Hours: The Glen Holly Jams – Volume 1
2006 Whips and Roses
2006 Whips and Roses II
2011 Teaser Deluxe

Live:
1997 Live at Ebbets Field 1974
1997 Live at Ebbets Field 1976
1997 Live at Northern Lights Recording Studio
1998 The Energy Radio Broadcasts
2000 First Time Live
2001 Live 9/19/76
2002 Live in Miami at Jai Alai: The Final Show
2003 Alive on Long Island
2003 Tommy Bolin and Energy Live
2004 Albany 9/20/76
2004 Live at the Jet Bar
1969 Zephyr
1971 Going Back to Colorado
1996 Live at Art’s Bar and Grill

Energy
1998 The Energy Radio Broadcasts 1972
1999 Energy (1972)
2003 Tommy Bolin & Energy, Live in Boulder / Sioux City 1972

James Gang:
1973 Bang
1974 Miami

Billy Cobham:
1973 Spectrum
2002 The Spectrum Sessions

Alphonse Mouzon:
1975 Mind Transplant
1999 Tommy Bolin & Alphonse Mouzon Fusion Jam (Rehearsals 1974)

Moxy
1975 Moxy

Deep Purple:
Come Taste the Band (1975)
1977 Last Concert in Japan
1995 King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents: Deep Purple in Concert
1995 On the Wings of a Russian Foxbat – Live in California ’76
2000 Days May Come and Days May Go (The California Rehearsals Volume 1)
2000 1420 Beachwood Drive (The California Rehearsals Volume 2)
2001 This Time Around

CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO SEE TOMMY BOLIN PHOTOS:
TOMMY BOLIN PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM
AND
TOMMY BOLIN FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM

TOMMY BOLIN PERFORMING LIVE AT WINTERLAND ON 5-7-76. PHOTO BY BEN UPHAM. MAGICAL MOMENT PHOTOS.

TOMMY BOLIN TEASING THE WINTERLAND WILD DOGS ON 5-7-76. PHOTO ART BY BEN UPHAM.


CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO SEE MORE TOMMY BOLIN PHOTOS:
TOMMY BOLIN PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM
AND
TOMMY BOLIN FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM

TOMMY BOLIN-
“TOMMY BOLIN IS SOMETHING SPECIAL”
BY JOHN FISHER
BUCKS COUNTY COURIER TIMES
LEVITTOWN, PA.
JANUARY 16, 1976

There’s magic in his strings, an energy aura surrounds him, you know wherever or with whomever guitarist Tommy Bolin is going to play, something special is going to happen.
Bolin, at the age of 24, has gathered a reputation for fine guitar playing which far exceeds his generic age. He started his career with Zephyr, which has gone down in rock history on the strength of its albums.
He moved on to do session work with Billy Cobham of the original Mahavishnu Orchestra. Became the lead guitarist for the James Gang, revitalizing the group, and presently is the lead guitarist for Deep Purple and pursuing solo work.
Bolin never stops moving forward as will be seen when he and Deep Purple hit the Spectrum on Sunday. Although this will be the first time the Philadelphia audience will have the chance to see Bolin in the lead position, they have heard him with Purple if they have the group’s new “Come Taste the Band” album..Bolin co-wrote seven of the 10 tunes on the album which release almost coincided with the release of his solo album, “Teaser” on the Atlantic label. Writing the bulk of the material for a group you just joined is unusual, especially when it is a major group with such hits as “Smoke on the Water,” in its discography.
But Bolin doesn’t feel like a newcomer, in fact he says he feels extremely comfortable with Deep Purple. “It’s getting better and better and better,” the young guitarist said. “We went out on tour not so far after I joined the group you know so we did Hawaii and New Zealand and we’re getting the whole trip tight and everything. So now it sounds incredible. . .it’s a good show,” Tommy explained from his first Fayettville North Carolina, the first stop in the American tour. He continued, “Sometimes it is difficult, I guess to fit in. With the James Gang I wrote most of the stuff and I guess that’s what made it easier. “Also I guess in writing a lot of the stuff it kind of takes some of the pressure off of being the new member or something like that for I feel like I’ve known them (Deep Purple) for a long time. And also it’s weird an American being with an English group.”
But Bolin said that doesn’t matter to him. “I feel extremely comfortable otherwise I wouldn’t have accepted the thing. I’ve learned my lesson. It got to the point with the James Gang it was a hassle.” Bolin explained the rift in the James Gang, “People always say—it was a difference in musical taste—it was that. It got to the point we really didn’t get along that well with each other towards the end and we were just like pretending with each other. “It doesn’t pay to do that I found out. So with Purple, I took a
couple of days to think about it and I spent some time with the people and I love them all and they love me. “It’s a very tight family, even with the road crew and stuff like that. When everything is that comfortable it makes for a better show.” Now that Bolin is part of the group he feels comfortable but to join, he had to overcome his apprehension of English bands. “I was kind of reluctant in joining an English band because—oh—just because a lot of English groups are very theatrically oriented whether it be with props or whatever. “They tell the same jokes every night, a lot of them will, I’m not saying that’s bad or anything but that isn’t the way I play. “I play on the spot type of playing. “The way we structure most of the material live is like a skeleton form so we can kind of take things where we want to go and whatever way we feel that night.
“So I feel the looseness of the way this English band is, or the way it’s structured now is the reason it’s getting better and better every night cause we’re learning about each other more on stage and learning how each other plays more and more.”
When Deep Purple finishes its tour, which has already covered Hawaii, New Zealand, Australia, Jakarta and Japan, Bolin said he intends to launch a solo tour. This tour will be generated and directed on the strength of his solo album “Teaser.” Bolin said he has noticed that his album has been liked by all but everybody differs on their favorite number from the album. “We’re in the South now and they love “Savannah Woman” but we thought it might of been because of Savannah Georgia and all- Even in the rock field, Bolin has gone a long way for a young musician. Perhaps it is due to his outlook on life.
“My philosophy is like, no matter whatever happens, no matter whatever I do, I know I’m doing it for a positive thing. “I’ve always believed that and it’s always happened. It’s a weird thing. “I spend a lot of money and stuff like that and people think, ‘you’re not going to have a buck,’ but I’ll spend it all and I’ll go through a month of starving but something will come about, it always has and I know it always will. “So that’s like my philosophy. I just never think negative… there’s negative things that happen but I think that the negative things happen for positive reasons.
“Unless something happens to change my philosophy, and I don’t think it can, I’ll be okay.” If Bolin’s philosophy is responsible for his meteoric rise, he will be getting a lot of converts.

TOMMY BOLIN DISCOGRAPHY:
1975 Teaser
1976 Private Eyes
1996 From the Archives, Vol. 1
1997 The Bottom Shelf
1998 From the Archives, Vol. 2
1999 Energy
1999 Snapshot
2000 Naked
2002 Naked II
2004 After Hours: The Glen Holly Jams – Volume 1
2006 Whips and Roses
2006 Whips and Roses II
2011 Teaser Deluxe

Live:
1997 Live at Ebbets Field 1974
1997 Live at Ebbets Field 1976
1997 Live at Northern Lights Recording Studio
1998 The Energy Radio Broadcasts
2000 First Time Live
2001 Live 9/19/76
2002 Live in Miami at Jai Alai: The Final Show
2003 Alive on Long Island
2003 Tommy Bolin and Energy Live
2004 Albany 9/20/76
2004 Live at the Jet Bar
1969 Zephyr
1971 Going Back to Colorado
1996 Live at Art’s Bar and Grill

Energy
1998 The Energy Radio Broadcasts 1972
1999 Energy (1972)
2003 Tommy Bolin & Energy, Live in Boulder / Sioux City 1972

James Gang:
1973 Bang
1974 Miami

Billy Cobham:
1973 Spectrum
2002 The Spectrum Sessions

Alphonse Mouzon:
1975 Mind Transplant
1999 Tommy Bolin & Alphonse Mouzon Fusion Jam (Rehearsals 1974)

Moxy
1975 Moxy

Deep Purple:
Come Taste the Band (1975)
1977 Last Concert in Japan
1995 King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents: Deep Purple in Concert
1995 On the Wings of a Russian Foxbat – Live in California ’76
2000 Days May Come and Days May Go (The California Rehearsals Volume 1)
2000 1420 Beachwood Drive (The California Rehearsals Volume 2)
2001 This Time Around
CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO SEE TOMMY BOLIN PHOTOS:
TOMMY BOLIN PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM
AND
TOMMY BOLIN FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM