Tagged: jim ayoub

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FRANK MARINO OF MAHOGANY RUSH PLAYING IN A CREEK ON MT. TAMALPAIS. PHOTO/ART BY BEN UPHAM.

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MAHOGANY RUSH MAGICAL MOMENT PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM
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MAHOGANY RUSH IN MISSOULA, MONTANA 1979
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FRANK MARINO & MAHOGANY RUSH- “KEEPING ON THE STRAIGHT AND NARROW”
by Andy Secher
Pop Rock Special Magazine
Fall 1980

“I don’t believe in following every new trend that comes down the pike,” Mahogany Rush’s lead guitarist and guiding light Frank Marino was saying recently, “Music that’s good will always be good. That’s why I think it’s ridiculous to just jump on every new musical bandwagon that comes along. Disco and New Wave may be all right for some people, but I’ll still take my chances with playing straight-ahead rock & roll.” Marino is undeniably something of an anachronism. With his waist-length hair, fringed leather stage outfits, and a guitar style that vividly recalls the halcyon days of such mid-60′s rock titans as Hendrix and Clapton, Marino often seems like a man out of place and out of time. Yet, somehow he manages to survive and prosper, proving that guitar-dominated rock & roll is still as viable and exciting a musical form as ever. “The type of music I play has really
never lost its popularity,” he said in a carefully worded manner. “People in media centers like New York or L.A. just don’t seem to realize that the rest of the world doesn’t always want to follow what they say is new and ‘hip.’ You go throughout the midwest, or down to Texas, and you’ll really see what’s happening on the rock scene. What it all boils down to is that people still want to hear loud, guitar-riff rock & roll and, quite frankly we’re a band that can give it to ‘em.”
On their new album, “What’s Next”, Marino and cohorts Paul Harwood (bass) Jim Ayoub (drums), and brother Vince Marino (rhythm guitar) have deftly avoided even the slightest association with the “dreaded” frontiers of disco aod new wave, choosing instead to stay firmly within the confines of their heavy metal approach. While it may not be the most aesthetically pleasing of styles, there’s’ little denying that on songs like Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame, and Marino’s guitar showcase Something’s Comin’ Our Way the band has has successfully managed to revitalize many of hard rock’s most time honored cliches. “I’m not trying to hype people when I say that “What’s Next” is by far the best album we’ve ever done,” Marino said in the clipped tones that reflect his Canadian upbringing. “The band has become a lot more cohesive over the last year, and I think we’ve become a little more dedicated to our music as well. We really cover a lot of terrain on the album, everything from the old blues thing Rock Me Baby to our version of the Door’s Roadhouse Blues, which is a real killer. All in all, I’m very proud of the album because it captures our vitality and all the energy that we have in our stage show. Sometimes we had to work for 48 straight hours in the studio to get a particular song to sound right, but I think the results are well worth the effort.”
Somewhat surprisingly for a musician who has seemingly dismissed any temptation to incorporate new ideas into his musical philosophy, Marino has begun to plan a radically different Mahogany Rush for the future. “What I’d like to do, he said, “is get about nine or ten really talented musicians in the band. Maybe we’d even have four or five guitarists. I really don’t have any intention of changing our style, but I’m fascinated with the possibility of creating what would be, in effect, a heavy metal orchestra. Everybody would have a very well-defined role to play, and if we could just get everyone to put their egos aside and concentrate on playing specific things, I think it could be fantastic. It would be like a hockey team with each player knowing his role and playing not for personal glory but for the good of the team. Of course,” he added with a sly laugh, “every team needs a captain, the guy who can give orders and take command, and that guy would be me.”
While his dream of a heavy metal “orchestra” is still a thing of the future, Marino faces a far more immediate task – that of being a major part in one of the most grueling tour projects ever conceived. Mahogany Rush, along with such major acts as Humble. Pie, Angel and Mother’s Finest, has undertaken an unprecedented 100 city tour, billed as the “Rock and Roll Marathon,” which sees them crisscross the United States from coast to coast. “I’m really looking forward to the ‘Marathon’,” Marino said.’ “It’s really a challenge, but we’re a band that has always thrived on the road, so we’re looking at it as a great opportunity to reach literally a million people with our music over the next few months. We’re headlining almost everyone of the shows, which is a real advantage because we’ll get a little more time on stage than the other acts. I think the ‘Marathon’ is a very daring, and a very good, idea. We’re putting four top-notch bands on one show, and touring all over the country with the same people. We’re not charging an arm and a leg for tickets, and with four acts I don’t think anybody can complain about not getting their money’s worth. But most importantly, what the ‘Marathon’ does is help project an image that rock & roll is still the most exciting thing around, and providing that is still what Mahogany Rush is all about.’

FRANK MARINO & MAHOGANY RUSH
DISCOGRAPHY:
1973 Maxoom (1971 in Canada)
1974 Child of the Novelty
1975 Strange Universe
1976 IV
1977 World Anthem
1978 Live
1979 Tales of the Unexpected
1980 What’s Next
1981 The Power of Rock ‘N’ Roll
1982 Juggernaut
1986 Full Circle
1988 Double Live
1990 From the Hip
1997 Dragonfly (Best of)
2000 Eye of the Storm
2004 Real Live

CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINKS FOR MORE THINGS THAT ARE MAHOGANY RUSH:
MAHOGANY RUSH FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM
and
MAHOGANY RUSH AT DAY ON THE GREEN IN OAKLAND 1976
and
MAHOGANY RUSH MAGICAL MOMENT PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM
and
MAHOGANY RUSH IN MISSOULA, MONTANA 1979
and
MAHOGANY RUSH MAGICAL MOMENT ART BY BEN UPHAM
and
PURCHASE MAHOGANY RUSH CD’S

A CONCERT REVIEW OF MAHOGANY RUSH IN WINNIPEG FROM THE 1976 TOUR.

An Ad for a Mahogany Rush Concert in Seattle in April, 1978. Judas Priest cancled.


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MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM
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MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS FROM MISSOULA, MONTANA BY BEN UPHAM
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MAHOGANY RUSH ART BY BEN UPHAM
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MAHOGANY RUSH FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM

MAHOGANY RUSH -
“CONCERT REVIEW”
BY ANDY MELLEN
WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, CANADA
SEPTEMBER 29, 1976

It’s always a pleasure to come across a Canadian group aspiring to international stardom. It’s even better when one encounters an act which possesses the ability to achieve such a lofty goal.
There are times, however, when I’m more than a trifle puzzled by the methods a group employs. A good case in point is my recent encounter with Frank Marino, founder and leader of a Montreal-based power trio called Mahogany Rush. At 21, he’s an amazingly gifted young guitarist and writer, as he has been proving the past few years on four albums.
Unfortunately, it’s doubtful whether anyone unfamiliar with Mahogany Rush’s records would have felt a great compulsion to rush out and purchase them following the group’s 35-minute set as the opening act for Nazareth’s Sept. 20 gig in the Winnipeg Arena.
Those who have heard all or most of the group’s recorded output were probably as perplexed as I was by its methodical, five-song set.
Save for the show-opening “New Rock and Roll”, Mahogany didn’t play one original song during its brief performance, a 15-minute version of Jimi Hendrix’s blues classic, Red House; an ancient blues standard called King Bee, Chuck Berry’s venerable Johnny B. Goode and an explosive rendition of the American national anthem, the Star-Spangled Banner, served up a la Jimi Hendrix with feedback and shrill, whining guitar passages.
As the group made its exit to a respectable round of applause from the 7,000 in attendance, I sat in disbelief, asking myself “Is that it?”
I was at a loss to understand how a group on the verge of earning a shot at the international spotlight with four albums of original material in its repertoire would even think about turning in the sort of set Mahogany Rush performed.
Following a 45-minute discussion with Marino, I was still having great difficulty trying to figure out this young musician. Although Marino — along with bassist Paul Harwood and drummer Jim Ayoub — still calls Montreal home, his attitude towards this country’s music scene could hardly be described as pro-Canadian. The fact that it has taken the group more than four years to play its first Western Canada dates (prior to the current tour, Mahogany’s only Canadian appearances outside of the province of Quebec were several Toronto gigs) is only one indication of Marino’s decided lack of interest in cultivating success in his native country.
Asked about the group’s show. Marino offered this explanation: “We were prepared to do our regular set tonight. Basically, that’s Dragonfly, The Answer and The Emperor off the new album (Mahogany Rush IV), a couple of things off the second and third albums and even a song, from Maxoom (the group’s three-year old debut effort).”
“After we did the first song and didn’t get any reaction, we decided to switch the set,” he said. “I can usually read a crowd, and this one just wasn’t receptive to the sort of music we play.”
Although I concurred that the group was somewhat mis-billed opening for Nazareth — a group which attracts a hardcore AM radio audience — I suggested the group’s ever-increasing following in this city came expecting to hear the group on Mahogany Rush’s albums. I won’t argue that much of Mahogany’s own music probably would have gone over the heads of many of the younger fans in attendance. But then, a 15-minute slow blues like Red House is probably just as alien to a young AM rock fan as some of the band’s spacier, jazz-tinged material.
Marino, however, expressed little regret for the group’s show. He seemed much more anxious to talk about the group’s success Stateside (the band is developing into a headliner in major centers such as Los Angeles and Chicago and is long-established in hard rock havens such as Detroit and Cleveland) and its first European tour.
Sadly, Frank Marino seems much more intent on making it in the United States and Europe than he is on satisfying his growing legion of Canadian fans.

FRANK MARINO & MAHOGANY RUSH
DISCOGRAPHY:
1973 Maxoom
1974 Child of the Novelty
1975 Strange Universe
1976 IV
1977 World Anthem
1978 Live
1979 Tales of the Unexpected
1980 What’s Next
1981 The Power of Rock ‘N’ Roll
1982 Juggernaut
1986 Full Circle
1988 Double Live
1990 From the Hip
1997 Dragonfly (Best of)
2000 Eye of the Storm
2004 Real Live

CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO SEE MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS AND ARTWORK:
MAHOGANY RUSH FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH ART BY BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH IN MISSOULA, MONTANA 1979 PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM

SUPER-IMPOSED PHOTO OF FRANK MARINO ON MT. TAM.  PHOTO ART BY BEN UPHAM. MAGICAL MOMENT PHOTOS.

FRANK MARINO OF MAHOGANY RUSH DURING A DAYDREAM I HAD ONCE ON MT. TAMALPAIS. PHOTO-ART BY BEN UPHAM.


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MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM (1975-1978)
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MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM (1979)
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MAHOGANY RUSH ART BY BEN UPHAM
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MAHOGANY RUSH FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM

MAHOGANY RUSH-
“RAW ENERGY”
THE BRANDON SUN
BRANDON, MANITOBA, CANADA
APRIL 11, 1980

Veteran rocker Frank Marino formed his own band when he was 15, about 10 years ago. Since then, Quebec based Mahogany Rush have been almost full-time travellers on the grinding American rock circuit.
The group’s ninth album, What’s Next?, was released in early March, just as the band started its most arduous rock tour yet — 48 concerts in 57 days throughout the U.S.
People have been predicting big things for Mahogany Rush for years but the band has yet to produce that platinum hit album that would launch Marino and cohorts Jimmy Ayoub, Paul Harwood and brother Vincent Marino to real stardom.
Sitting in his favorite haunt in the old working-class Point St. Charles district of Montreal, Marino, the lead guitarist, professed an almost philosophical patience as he readied himself for the tour. “I’m a veteran and yet I’m only 25. I haven’t put in this much time for nothing. I look upon this year as a building period. “Next year should be the year we really break out.”
Despite his curiously anachronistic hippie appearance, Marino talks like a young man who knows exactly where he’s going. Relaxing in Montreal between tours, he had been producing an album by Quebec rock-disco queen Nanette Workman and his New York management has assigned him to produce a couple of new acts. He also has high hopes for the group’s new album. “It’s going to be a lot easier playing this album on stage than some of our earlier records, where I tried to show how versatile Frank Marino was (with electric pedal, synthesizers and the like.) This one concentrates on raw energy. “It’s more of a team effort, just one lead, one rhythm guitar and a minimum of overdubs.”
Touring is the same old grind, but consistently its own reward with increasing exposure to greater numbers of record buyers. “There’s not much chance to do anything while touring. You’re up at seven to get to the place you’re playing that night. You’re picked up by a limousine, you go to the hotel, freshen up, then go to the sound check, then you change and get ready in the dressing room. “After the show you might meet back at the hotel bar, go to bed late, and start all over again the next day.” Still, the grind has paid off for Mahogany Rush, which Marino describes as basically financially secure.

FRANK MARINO & MAHOGANY RUSH
DISCOGRAPHY:

1973 Maxoom
1974 Child of the Novelty
1975 Strange Universe
1976 IV
1977 World Anthem
1978 Live
1979 Tales of the Unexpected
1980 What’s Next
1981 The Power of Rock ‘N’ Roll
1982 Juggernaut
1986 Full Circle
1988 Double Live
1990 From the Hip
1997 Dragonfly (Best of)
2000 Eye of the Storm
2004 Real Live
CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO SEE MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS & ART:
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM (1975-1978)
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM (1979)
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH ART BY BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM

MAHOGANY RUSH IN MISSOULA, MONTANA ON 5-25-79. PHOTO BY BEN UPHAM. MAGICAL MOMENT PHOTOS.

FRANK MARINO OF MAHOGANY RUSH ROCKING OUT IN MISSOULA, MONTANA ON 5-25-79. PHOTO BY BEN UPHAM.


CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO SEE MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS:
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM
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MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS FROM 5-25-79 BY BEN UPHAM
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MAHOGANY RUSH ART BY BEN UPHAM
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MAHOGANY RUSH FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM

MAHOGANY RUSH
“HARD ROCK AT A ROCK BOTTOM PRICE”
BY HUGH GALLAGHER
THE ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL
ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO
SEPTEMBER 11, 1977

Frank Marino and Mahogany Rush will begin taping a live album in Albuquerque at a concert featuring hard rock at a rock bottom price.
Mahogany Rush, Rex and Trooper will perform at Civic Auditorium, Wednesday, at 7i30 p.m. The concert is being presented by radio station KRKE and tickets sell for $1.94.
“We’ll be doing a couple tunes that nobody’s heard before,” Marino said in a telephone interview. The new material will be in a jazz-rock vein. Marino and Mahogany Rush are known for hard rock. Marino said that in the beginning he was influenced entirely by Jimi Hendrix but has since come under the influence of jazzmen such as George Benson and Chick Corea. “The new material is a combination of jazz and rock. I want to create something of my own. It won’t have a definition,” Marino said.
Mahogany Rush was formed in 1971 in Montreal. In addition to Marino who plays guitar, sings and writes all the group’s material, there is Jimmy Ayoub on drums and Paul Harwood on bass.
“There’s a big rock scene in Montreal, a lot bigger than in any other
Canadian city.” Marino said. “At that time the biggest international groups were Pink Floyd, Genesis, Yes, that kind of rock group.”
Marino claims that at 14 he took 500 hits of LSD, he landed in the hospital and effects of the drug are still with him. The name Mahogany Rush was an attempt by Marino to describe his experience. “The name came from the experience I had using mind-expanding drugs. The name came before the band. It was what you might call a sensation or hallucination,” Marino said. That experience is the root of Marino’s music. “I’m trying to recreate them (the drug experiences). I’m trying to recreate the realizations I had from them,” Marino said. He hasn’t taken LSD since that experience at 14, He told an interviewer once, “One day I realized this was not good — there was no way I could take it.”
Rolling Stone calls the latest Mahogany Rush album “World Anthem”
(Columbia PC-3-1677) “an exercise in contradiction, and therein lies its major strength. On the one hand we have the sheer nastiness of Marino’s guitar, while on the other (somewhat buried underneath sheaths of unnecessary production) Marino’s lyrics proclaim eternal love and hope.”
The band’s name was changed from Mahogany Rush to Frank Marino and Mahogany Rush to avoid confusion with those other hard rockers Rush. Marino said the confusion was usually to the disadvantage of Mahogany Rush.
When not performing, Marino enjoys racing stock cars around Montreal. He said, “When I’m behind the wheel of a supercharged car, I can forget about everything.”

FRANK MARINO & MAHOGANY RUSH
DISCOGRAPHY:

1973 Maxoom
1974 Child of the Novelty
1975 Strange Universe
1976 IV
1977 World Anthem
1978 Live
1979 Tales of the Unexpected
1980 What’s Next
1981 The Power of Rock ‘N’ Roll
1982 Juggernaut
1986 Full Circle
1988 Double Live
1990 From the Hip
1997 Dragonfly (Best of)
2000 Eye of the Storm
2004 Real Live

CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO SEE MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS:
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS BY BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS FROM 5-25-79 BY BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH ART BY BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM

FRANK MARINO OF MAHOGANY RUSH PERFORMING LIVE IN SEATTLE, WA. ON 4-14-78. PHOTO ART BY BEN UPHAM. MAGICAL MOMENT PHOTOS.

FRANK MARINO OF MAHOGANY RUSH TURNING THINGS VERY ELECTRIC IN SEATTLE ON 4-14-78. PHOTO ART BY BEN UPHAM.


CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO SEE MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS:
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS FROM 1975,1976 & 1978 BY BEN UPHAM
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS FROM 5-25-79 BY BEN UPHAM
MAHOGANY RUSH ART BY BEN UPHAM
MAHOGANY RUSH FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM

MAHOGANY RUSH
“MAXOOM REVIEW” BY ANDY MELLON
WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
MANITOBA, CANADA
MARCH 10, 1973

Mahogany Rush—”Maxoom”: Contrary to what you might have heard or read, Jimi Hendrix is currently alive and well and playing in Montreal. Actually, that theory might not be too far from the truth, and once you’ve heard Mahogany Rush, I doubt whether you’ll be too anxious to dispute the issue.
Mahogany Rush is a three-man group headed by 17-year old guitarist Frank Marino who, quite frankly, sounds like the reincarnation of Hendrix. No kidding, he’s got every one of Jimi’s licks down cold, and he even manages to expand on them occasionally. He even sings like the master, and I swear that it’s almost impossible to tell the difference between Marino and any vintage Hendrix side if you’re standing in the next room.
All of the songs were penned by Marino, although most of them are highly derivative ( “Blues” sound’s like “Red House”, “Maxoom” is really “EXP” and so on). One song, “Buddy”, is a touching tribute to Jimi, featuring the line “Rest easy Jimi, I’ll carry on singing.” What has to impress you is that at the tender age of 17, Marino not only plays guitar like someone twice his age, but he also produced and arranged the LP.
Mahogany Rush is currently the hottest thing going in Quebec and given time to mature and expand its musical horizons, I’m sure this group is capable of doing just about anything it sets its mind to doing.
***
Other Reviews:
I first heard this album almost 30 years ago… I’m a big HENDRIX fan this cat is a great guitarist and dedicates this album to him.It is great a must have for any Frank Marino fan.I was digging through some old albums (none witch are playable but I can’t get rid of them) and ran across this album just thought I would check and see if it was on CD well here it is . I’m going to order two copies one to listen to and one to pass on to my grand children so they can have some good music to listen to because they just don’t make music like this anymore. Buy it you won’t regret it!!!
-Howard Rager 3-24-03
***
And since Frank did pay tribute to Jimi Hendrix by “Dedicating” this first Mahogany Rush LP. It only seems fair to say that if Jimi did have a conversation with Frank he would no doubt have said to him “Frank, my whole life I wish I could have put together a band and recorded an album as tight and diverse as you did.” MAXOOM Stands on it’s own as a lp/cd. Nothing like it has ever been done before or since. From Rock, Jazz, Blues and all points in between. The first song BUDDY is a testimonial to a soul brother who touched a life, then passed away. And you want to live to make him proud of you. Going through a song by song review is fruitless. Get this lp/cd now!! Or better yet!!Get the 2 cd set that has Mahogany Rush’s first 3 lp’s on them.Sound is great!! Price is right!! Amazon.com deliver’s to you’re front door!! All you need is the Stereo up to 11, and a Funky Woman.
-James Lane 11-14-01
***

FRANK MARINO & MAHOGANY RUSH
DISCOGRAPHY:
1973 Maxoom
1974 Child of the Novelty
1975 Strange Universe
1976 IV
1977 World Anthem
1978 Live
1979 Tales of the Unexpected
1980 What’s Next
1981 The Power of Rock ‘N’ Roll
1982 Juggernaut
1986 Full Circle
1988 Double Live
1990 From the Hip
1997 Dragonfly (Best of)
2000 Eye of the Storm
2004 Real Live

CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO SEE MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS:
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS FROM 1975, 1976 & 1978 BY BEN UPHAM
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS FROM 5-25-79 BY BEN UPHAM
MAHOGANY RUSH ART BY BEN UPHAM
MAHOGANY RUSH FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM

Mahogany Rush performing live in Oakland, Ca. on June 6, 1976. Photo by Ben Upham. Magical Moment Photos.

MAHOGANY RUSH LIVE IN OAKLAND, CA. 6/6/76. PHOTO BY BEN UPHAM


CLICK ON LINKS BELOW TO SEE MORE MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS:
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS by BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS FROM MISSOULA, MONTANA 5-25-79 BY BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH ART BY BEN UPHAM

MAHOGANY RUSH – “LOUD, LOUD, LOUD”
by KATHY MISICHKO
CHRONICLE TELEGRAM, ELYRIA, OHIO
SUNDAY JUNE 13, 1976

Mahogany Rush, one of the hottest bands on the music scene today, had rather obscure beginnings in Montreal some five years ago. Frank Marino, lead guitarist, vocalist, writer and producer, had a bad acid trip when he was 14 and ended up in the hospital. While there, he had a strange trip and envisioned himself as Jerry Garcia (Grateful Dead).
He picked up a guitar and began playing “Viola Lee Blues”. The unusual thing about this was Marino had never played a guitar because he was more interested in drums. He played the song perfectly and soon after, the Jimi Hendrix style hit him.
He began composing songs at 15 and met Jimmy Ayoub, Mahogany Rush’s drummer. “We didn’t really have a formal group, but played for the music,” recalled Marino. The duo went through many bassists before Marino remembered Paul Harwood, who he had known for some time.
“We found a sort of communal rehearsal hall in Montreal where we played every day. Gradually, we began to notice that there were an awful lot of people coming down regularly to hear us.”
Eventually, the trio was playing at the coffee house next door, then local high school concerts and outdoor festivals.
According to Marino. “Nothing was really planned, but after a while it gets into your blood.”

IN 1971, MAHOGANY RUSH played a pop festival at the Montreal Expo, That exposure eventually led to the recording of their first single, “Buddy”, and a subsequent album, “Maxoom”, on the Canadian Westbound Records label.
Two more albums, “Child of the Novelty” and “Strange Universe” followed. The group had developed a strong following in Detroit, where they played many concerts at the Michigan Palace and Cobo Hall.
“We were really getting off the ground in the U.S. and suddenly there was a lot of confusion” said Marino. “The ‘Strange Universe’ album was doing so well that our record company decided to release our first two albums, which they had bought from Westbound. Neither of them were recorded very well and since they had never been released in the States, people thought they were new. It was not the kind of situation we wanted.”
The guitarist went to David Krebs of Leber-Krebs Management for assistance, as he had known Krebs during the Detroit days. “In the end, we decided to start all over, this time with all the right elements, David managing, Columbia Records as a label; and Premier Talents as agents.” The results of the above combination was the group’s latest album, “Mahogany Rush IV”, released in April.

MAHOGANY RUSH has been accused of “ripping off” the Hendrix style of music. Although a concert repertoire includes Hendrix material as well as other artists’ work, Marino defends his band with the following, “Face it, there are a lot of loud trios and flashy guitarists around these days, so I’ve got to put a little extra effort into the music so that there can be no mistaking the sound of Mahogany Rush”. Marino is quite accurate when he states “loud musicians.” Mahogany Rush’s recent concert at Elyna’s Joker was so loud that many people in the capacity-filled club were leaving before the concert was finished. It is hard to believe that a talented group such as Mahogany Rush would want to distort the sound of their music by amplifying it to the skies. Marino, an excellent guitarist, and his band played a combination of original material and copy numbers, but the deafening manner in which they presented the music was very detrimental to their overall
performance. Perhaps this is another group which can best be enjoyed at home on one’s own stereo, where the volume can be controlled to a level of personal enjoyment…Then again, some like it Loud, Loud, Loud…

FRANK MARINO & MAHOGANY RUSH
DISCOGRAPHY
1973 Maxoom
1974 Child of the Novelty
1975 Strange Universe
1976 IV
1977 World Anthem
1978 Live
1979 Tales of the Unexpected
1980 What’s Next
1981 The Power of Rock ‘N’ Roll
1982 Juggernaut
1986 Full Circle
1988 Double Live
1990 From the Hip
1997 Dragonfly (Best of)
2000 Eye of the Storm
2004 Real Live

CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO SEE MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS:
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS by BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH FINE ART AMERICA IMAGES BY BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH PHOTOS FROM MISSOULA, MONTANA 5-25-79 BY BEN UPHAM
AND
MAHOGANY RUSH ART BY BEN UPHAM