Tagged: DAY ON THE GREEN PHOTOS

Blue Oyster Cult Live in Oakland, Ca. on 6-6-76. Photo by Ben Upham. Magical Moment Photos.

BLUE OYSTER CULT ROCKING OUT AT THE DAY ON THE GREEN IN OAKLAND, CA. ON JUNE 6, 1976. PHOTO BY BEN UPHAM.


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BLUE OYSTER CULT-
“BLUE OYSTER & BLACK OAK”
BY JOHN E. HOLMES
THE CORPUS CHRISTI TIMES
CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS
NOVEMBER 1, 1977

The Blue Oyster Cult and Black Oak invaded Memorial Coliseum last night in the second sold out concert in a week and proved why they’re touted as two of America’s most improved bands.
Black Oak, with four new members but led by the inimitable Jim “Dandy” Mangrum, took the stage first and motored through an impressive 10-song set which displayed the best of both its worlds. Previously regarded as the worlds foremost “raunch and roll” band, Black Oak is now a tight, straight forward band with as much or more finesse as any other high-energy act around. Mangrum and guitarist Jimmy Henderson have surrounded themselves with four of Memphis better musicians and the rise in musical quality is almost amazing.
New guitarists Jack Holder and Greg Reding blend right in with Henderson, swapping leads and fighting guitar duels, while the new rhythm section of bassist Andy Tanas and drummer Joel Williams build a rock-steady platform on which the music is built. During the set, Black Oak proved they could still rock with anyone, especially on some of its older songs like “Great Balls of Fire” and “Hot And Nasty,” which is exactly as its title suggests.
But the truly impressive part of Black Oak’s snow is the brand new material found on its latest album, “Race With The Devil.” Throughout the evening, Black Oak played five of the eight songs on the album, all with a mixture of flair and Southern-fried energy. The new, improved Black Oak sounds lean mean and hungry. All the fat has been trimmed away leaving a tight, heady outfit with a new direction and some straightforward ideas on how to get there. Basically, the reason the old band was dissolved in favor of this new one is that its members were getting complacent about putting their hearts into the music and Mangrum just couldn’t live with that. So it was onward and upward and if last night’s show was any indication of what Black Oak is now capable of, the sky’s the limit.
The Blue Oyster Cult hit town with a brand new album and one of rock’s finest light shows, both of which were fairly impressive last night. The Cult has also undergone some musical direction changes recently. Though the music was softened up a bit for “Agents Of Fortune ” the new material is a cross between this softness and the old blitz-rock of earlier days.
But strangely enough, the highlights of BOC’s set were the old standards. The group played three songs from its very first album, including the opener, “Stairway To The Stars” and the murderous “Cities On Flame,” which featured some lightning from lead guitarist Donald “Buck Dharma” Roeser. The third oldie, “Then Came The Last Days May,” featuring an extended guitar solo, revealed the first major operation of the Cult’s infamous laser light show. As the sharp green laser beams reflected off strategically located mirror balls, the Cult got hotter and hotter, culminating in three monster songs which made a good show almost great. The thumping “Godzilla” featured more extended guitar work and long drum solo by Albert Bouchard made worthwhile by the lasers and strobes. Albert teamed with brother Joe Bouchard on bass to power the group through “Summer Of Love” into a searing, lasered, strobed firebombed climax of “Born To Be Wild.”
BOC returned for an encore of “Dominance And Submission” but didn’t totally satisfy until playing “Don’t Fear The Reaper”, it’s number one single of 1976. The Cult’s light show was impressive and the music itself isn’t bad, but the major complaints against the band remained valid last night. They can get a littler boring by extending things too long at times, and they have no stage show at all. There really isn’t even much energy flowing up there. They were good no doubt about that, but with a little work this show could be one of the best.

BLUE OYSTER CULT DISCOGRAPHY:

1972 Blue Öyster Cult
1973 Tyranny and Mutation
1974 Secret Treaties
1975 On Your Feet or On Your Knees
1976 Agents of Fortune
1977 Spectres
1978 Some Enchanted Evening
1979 Mirrors
1980 Cultösaurus Erectus
1981 Fire of Unknown Origin
1982 Extraterrestrial Live
1983 The Revölution by Night
1986 Club Ninja
1988 Imaginos
1994 Cult Classic
1994 Live 1976
1998 Heaven Forbid
2001 Curse of the Hidden Mirror
2001 St. Cecilia: The Elektra Recordings
2002 A Long Day’s Night

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BUCK DHARMA OF BLUE OYSTER CULT PERFORMING LIVE AT THE OAKLAND COLISEUM ON JUNE 6, 1976. PHOTO-ART BY BEN UPHAM. MAGICAL MOMENT PHOTOS.

THE AMAZING BLUE OYSTER CULT ELECTRIFY THE SHOW AT OAKLAND ON 6-6-76. PHOTO-ART BY BEN UPHAM.


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BLUE OYSTER CULT-
“MIND-BLOWING SPECTACLE”
BY LARRY KELP
THE OAKLAND TRIBUNE
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA
DECEMBER 12, 1977

You want spectacle? Try Earth. Wind and Fire three nights at the Oakland Coliseum Arena, or Blue Oyster Cult Saturday at the Cow Palace.
Never mind the music, these shows attract an audience to see mind-blowing circus.
EWF’s Friday opener was preceded by soul band Pockets which, for the 20-minute spot “it was given, showed some potential. Deniece Williams was over-dramatic and under-clothed, and in a small theater would have been at home, but in the Coliseum cavern was out of place. Their mentors, EWF, followed with an eye-opening two hours of colorful costumes and props. The band’s creed of happiness and meaning through positive living was carried out through visual imagery. Egyptian mythology, astrology, magic, pyramids and some effects straight out of Star Trek. It was not unlike a funk interpretation of a Sun Ra concert.
After an opening gong ceremony, nine transparent tubes descended to the stage, and with a flash of smoke appeared to fill with the core members of the band. Up went the tubes, and on went the music: “Serpentine Fire.” the No. 1 hit from the new “All in All” album, helped by flashing and twirling of robes. The finale featured several golden spacemen preparing a large pyramid into which the band members disappeared, then the pyramid ascended above the stage, and in a flash of smoke blew open. The spacemen standing below took off their helmets and—surprise!—it was the band.
Master magician Doug Henning designed the stage trickery for the EWF show. Too bad he did not do something to improve the music. Once a raw but original percussion-oriented band, EWF has become too slick and image conscious of late. Their records may sell a couple million copies each now, but they lack the human quality and distinctiveness of earlier material. Still, EWF provides great entertainment. Leader Maurice White spends most of the time clutching at himself and strutting about, while bassist brother Verdine and guitarist AI McKay are non-stop dancers. How can anyone not like a band that enjoys performing as much as EWF does?
After obnoxious opening performances by Piper and Black Oak Arkansas (the latter at least plays competently, although Jim Dandy’s vocals are still a questionable matter), Long Island’s heavy metal masters Blue Oyster Cult dazzled with their biggest production yet.
Ignoring the musical aspects, there are two basic ways to stage a rock show: with props or with lights. Where EWF used the former. BOC relied on one of the most elaborate lighting systems extant. The result-with fog machines, tons of colored lights and three laser machines augmented sonically by a quadraphonic sound system—was technically advanced over that of the Wings show, and made Electric Light Orchestra’s laser extravaganza seem as effective as a flashlight.
Like EWF, BOC’s present music does not match the raw creative energy of its early days. Opening song “R. U. Ready 2 Rock” kicked off a dull 20 minutes that finally started to pick up with “Golden Age of Leather.” and by “Then Came the Last Days of May” and “Godzilla” the band and audience were in high gear. For “Godzilla” the Cow Palace was filled with hundreds of green laser beams bounced off mirror balls hung from the ceiling. Two beams projected on the back wall changed shapes and danced with each other, then spread into the audience. The three-dimensional effect meant you didn’t just see the show, you were in it as well. Like the Busby Berkeley films of the ’30s. EWF and BOC’s shows may not have a lot to do with music any more, but they sure make for great entertainment…

BLUE OYSTER CULT DISCOGRAPHY:

1972 Blue Öyster Cult
1973 Tyranny and Mutation
1974 Secret Treaties
1975 On Your Feet or On Your Knees
1976 Agents of Fortune
1977 Spectres
1978 Some Enchanted Evening
1979 Mirrors
1980 Cultösaurus Erectus
1981 Fire of Unknown Origin
1982 Extraterrestrial Live
1983 The Revölution by Night
1986 Club Ninja
1988 Imaginos
1994 Cult Classic
1994 Live 1976
1998 Heaven Forbid
2001 Curse of the Hidden Mirror
2001 St. Cecilia: The Elektra Recordings
2002 A Long Day’s Night

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SUPER-IMPOSED PHOTO OF FRANK MARINO ON MT. TAM.  PHOTO ART BY BEN UPHAM. MAGICAL MOMENT PHOTOS.

FRANK MARINO OF MAHOGANY RUSH DURING A DAYDREAM I HAD ONCE ON MT. TAMALPAIS. PHOTO-ART BY BEN UPHAM.


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MAHOGANY RUSH-
“RAW ENERGY”
THE BRANDON SUN
BRANDON, MANITOBA, CANADA
APRIL 11, 1980

Veteran rocker Frank Marino formed his own band when he was 15, about 10 years ago. Since then, Quebec based Mahogany Rush have been almost full-time travellers on the grinding American rock circuit.
The group’s ninth album, What’s Next?, was released in early March, just as the band started its most arduous rock tour yet — 48 concerts in 57 days throughout the U.S.
People have been predicting big things for Mahogany Rush for years but the band has yet to produce that platinum hit album that would launch Marino and cohorts Jimmy Ayoub, Paul Harwood and brother Vincent Marino to real stardom.
Sitting in his favorite haunt in the old working-class Point St. Charles district of Montreal, Marino, the lead guitarist, professed an almost philosophical patience as he readied himself for the tour. “I’m a veteran and yet I’m only 25. I haven’t put in this much time for nothing. I look upon this year as a building period. “Next year should be the year we really break out.”
Despite his curiously anachronistic hippie appearance, Marino talks like a young man who knows exactly where he’s going. Relaxing in Montreal between tours, he had been producing an album by Quebec rock-disco queen Nanette Workman and his New York management has assigned him to produce a couple of new acts. He also has high hopes for the group’s new album. “It’s going to be a lot easier playing this album on stage than some of our earlier records, where I tried to show how versatile Frank Marino was (with electric pedal, synthesizers and the like.) This one concentrates on raw energy. “It’s more of a team effort, just one lead, one rhythm guitar and a minimum of overdubs.”
Touring is the same old grind, but consistently its own reward with increasing exposure to greater numbers of record buyers. “There’s not much chance to do anything while touring. You’re up at seven to get to the place you’re playing that night. You’re picked up by a limousine, you go to the hotel, freshen up, then go to the sound check, then you change and get ready in the dressing room. “After the show you might meet back at the hotel bar, go to bed late, and start all over again the next day.” Still, the grind has paid off for Mahogany Rush, which Marino describes as basically financially secure.

FRANK MARINO & MAHOGANY RUSH
DISCOGRAPHY:

1973 Maxoom
1974 Child of the Novelty
1975 Strange Universe
1976 IV
1977 World Anthem
1978 Live
1979 Tales of the Unexpected
1980 What’s Next
1981 The Power of Rock ‘N’ Roll
1982 Juggernaut
1986 Full Circle
1988 Double Live
1990 From the Hip
1997 Dragonfly (Best of)
2000 Eye of the Storm
2004 Real Live
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